ENERGY

To solve climate change and biodiversity loss, we need a Global Deal for Nature

The best way to curb greenhouse gas emissions and remove gases from the atmosphere is by storing carbon in natural ecosystems. Earth’s cornucopia of life has evolved over 550 million years. Along the way, five mass…

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WILDLIFE

Climate “Tipping Points” Could Add Trillions to the Costs of Warming

Such processes are often missing from climate models, leading to underestimates of long-term damage “Tipping elements” in the rapidly warming Arctic may add trillions of dollars to the long-term costs of climate change, a new…

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SOCIAL

Arctic warming will accelerate climate change and impact global economy

Carbon released into the atmosphere by the increasing loss of Arctic permafrost, combined with higher solar absorption by the Earth’s surface due to the melting of sea ice and land snow, will accelerate climate change…

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SOCIAL

Inequality is decreasing between countries—but climate change is slowing progress

Forecasts have painted a difficult picture for the future. But one new study argues that climate change has already imposed an economic penalty on many countries. SCIENTISTS HAVE KNOWN for decades that climate change is reshaping…

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POLICY

The Rich Get Richer Under Climate Change, 50 Years of Data Shows

According to a new study, rising temperatures have reduced the GDP of many poor nations and boosted economic output of wealthier countries Most people are familiar with the environmental impacts of climate change, including increased…

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TECHNOLOGY

‘Do everything in your power to tackle climate change’ UN chief urges on Mother Earth Day

Billed officially as an Interactive Dialogue on Harmony with Nature, the UN General Assembly session involved Member States and top officials discussing the need to take urgent action against the pace of global warming, in line with…

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Top Stories

ENERGY
25 April 2019

The best way to curb greenhouse gas emissions and remove gases from the atmosphere is by storing carbon in natural ecosystems. Earth’s cornucopia of life has evolved over 550 million years. Along the way, five mass…

WILDLIFE

Climate “Tipping Points” Could Add Trillions to the Costs of Warming

Such processes are often missing from climate models, leading to underestimates of long-term damage “Tipping elements” in the rapidly warming Arctic may add trillions of dollars to the long-term costs of climate change, a new…

FULL STORY
WILDLIFE
9 April 2019

By Bianca Nogrady, Ensia “We are still in.” On June 5, 2017, with these four words a group of U.S. businesses and investors with a combined annual revenue of $1.4 trillion sent a powerful message…

SOCIAL

Arctic warming will accelerate climate change and impact global economy

Carbon released into the atmosphere by the increasing loss of Arctic permafrost, combined with higher solar absorption by the Earth’s surface due to the melting of sea ice and land snow, will accelerate climate change...
FULL STORY
More NEWS

Images of Change

Deforestation near Pucallpa, Peruvian Amazon

June 20, 2016 – June 7, 2017

November 13, 1986 – October 30, 2016

Large areas within the Amazon rainforest have undergone large-scale deforestation over the past few decades. However, in locations like the Peruvian Amazon, most of the deforestation is caused in recent years by small-scale agriculture, according to the Monitoring of the Andean Amazon Project. These images show land about 25 miles (about 40 kilometers) northwest of Pucallpa along the Aguaytia River. Lush green dominates the 1986 image (left), while deforested land is light green or pink in the 2016 image. Two large-scale oil palm plantations dominate the 2016 image.

Images taken by Landsat. Source: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Landsat Missions Gallery: “Monitoring Deforestation in the Amazon”; U.S. Department of the Interior / USGS and NASA.

Arctic sea-ice coverage hits record low

June 20, 2016 - June 7, 2017

1984 – 2012

The area of the Arctic Ocean covered in ice increases during the winter and then shrinks during the summer, usually reaching the year’s low point in September. The minimum coverage for 2012 set a record low since at least 1979, when the first reliable satellite measurements began. These images compare the 1984 minimum, which was roughly equal to the average minimum extent for 1979–2000, with that of 2012, when the minimum was about half that. The 2013 minimum was larger, but continued the long-term downward trend of about 12 percent sea-ice loss per decade since the late 1970s, a decline that accelerated after 2007. The 2016 minimum was tied for the second-lowest on record. “At the rate we’re observing this decline,” said NASA scientist Joey Comiso, “it’s very likely that the Arctic’s summer sea ice will completely disappear within this century.”

Images by NASA Scientific Visualization Studio. Information sources: 2012: NASA Earth Observatory, 2013: NASA Earth Observatory, 2016: NASA Global Climate Change.

Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, erupted 26 years ago

Summer, mid-1920s to early 1940s - August 10, 2005

January 26, 1992 – April 4, 2017

Mount Pinatubo had likely been dormant for hundreds of years, making it difficult to persuade local residents to evacuate once it began showing signs of an eruption during the spring of 1991. When it did erupt on June 15, 1991, it was one of the largest volcanic eruptions of the 20th century. Today, the mountain is relatively quiet and about 984 feet (about 300 meters) shorter than it was before the eruption. In the 2017 image (right), green near the summit indicates forest regrowth, and pink stretches streaming from the mountain show scars from fast-moving floods of volcanic ash and water. Called “lahars,” these floods affected more people than the eruption itself and continue to be hazardous.

Images taken by Landsat. Source: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Landsat Missions Gallery: “Mount Pinatubo, Philippines, Erupted 26 Years Ago”; U.S. Department of the Interior / USGS and NASA.

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